in schools & colleges...in your community

Our military out of schools campaign

The UK armed forces visit thousands of schools each year. They offer school presentation teams, youth teams, ‘careers advisors’ and lessons plans. The Government is suggesting the expansion of cadet forces within state schools to encourage the military ‘spirit’ and that ex-soldiers mentor youngsters in schools. Should the armed forces by given access to children within education? How can we challenge their activities in schools and colleges? How can a more balanced view of what life in the armed forces involves be given to young people? Read more about the Military Out Of Schools campaign

get involved in the campaign

Look here for how you can get involved in the campaign.

Useful resources

June 2014

A short film made by Headliners and ForcesWatch, 2014

Why does the military have a 'youth engagement' policy and why is the government promoting 'military ethos' within education? What is the impact of military activities taking place in schools? ForcesWatch have been working with the charity Headliners and a group of young people in London to produce this short film which explores these questions and gives teenagers the opportunity to voice their reaction to the military’s interest in their lives.

The film focuses on military activities in schools, including presentations and other visits by the armed forces and the Department for Education's 'Military Ethos in Schools' policy - as well as community cadet forces. It looks at young people's experiences and views and ask questions about the agenda behind the 'youth engagement' policy and the reluctance of the Department for Education and Ministry of Defence to discuss it with young people themselves.

This film will encourage young people to reflect on and debate military-related activities aimed at them.

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2014


A BBC resource. Includes a final section on 'could this happen today'?

At the outbreak of war in 1914, the British Army had 700,000 available men. Germany’s wartime army was over 3.7 million. When a campaign for volunteers was launched, thousands answered the call to fight. Among them were 250,000 boys and young men under the age of 19, the legal limit for armed service overseas.

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2014

Choices Then and Now is a cross curricular resource that suggests strategies for teaching about World War I, recent and current conflicts, extremism and resilience and the choices available to people then and now.

The  full colour booklet provides a scheme of work, differentiated mid term plans and a range of untold  stories to engage  primary, secondary and post sixteen students. The accompanying CD ROM contains limited stories and activities for Key Stage 1 and a wide range of materials for teaching and learning across all phases, largely drawn from items in the Peace Museum UK’s extensive collection. Visit www.peacemuseum.org.uk to find out more about the diverse items in the collection.

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January 2014

Guardian Data has extracted details of 654 records from the National Archive to look at who conscientiously objected to the first world war and why

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2014

This 2-sided ForcesWatch briefing (2014) outlines the extent and nature of armed forces visits to schools and the Department for Education's 'Military ethos in schools' policy. It summaries what the concerns about these activities are and what students, parents and others can do to challenge them.

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November 2013

A ForcesWatch poster showing policy, cultural and other recent developments affecting the extent of military influence in young people's lives.

 

 


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2013

Teach Peace, a new resource from the Peace Education Network, is a set of eight assemblies, follow-up activities, resources, prayers and reflections on peace for primary schools.

From the UN peace day, 21 September, to the International Day for Children as Victims of War, 4 June, the school year is filled with opportunities to use the assemblies and activities in Teach Peace. This resource will help to ensure peace is a key theme in our children’s education and help you to celebrate peace and the peacemakers in your school.

The entire resource is free to download below. Hard copies of Teach Peace are available from the Peace Education Network for £5.

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The Woodcraft Folk is a movement for young people:

"Our aim is to have great fun, but also to try and develop children’s self-confidence and build their awareness of society around them.

"Through our activities, outings and camps we help our members understand important issues like the environment, world debt and global conflict and, in recent years, we have focused on sustainable development."

The Woodcraft Folk are campaigning to challenge military activities in schools.

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June 2013

The youth edition of Journeys in the Spirit provides a range of ideas to use with 12–18 year olds in a Quaker context.

Quakers and the Military includes listening, talking and action points and explores the following questions:

  • What is the military? What are military values?
  • When do we encounter (see/meet) the military?
  • How did Quakers feel about the military in the past, and what did they do about it?
  • How do we feel about the military now?
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updated May 2013

This ForcesWatch briefing outlines the methods and rationale of the military's engagement with young people within the education system and highlights potential developments in this area, including projects under consideration or development by the Armed Forces and the Department of Education.

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