in schools & colleges...in your community

Our military out of schools campaign

The UK armed forces visit thousands of schools each year. They offer school presentation teams, youth teams, ‘careers advisors’ and lessons plans. The Government is suggesting the expansion of cadet forces within state schools to encourage the military ‘spirit’ and that ex-soldiers mentor youngsters in schools. Should the armed forces by given access to children within education? How can we challenge their activities in schools and colleges? How can a more balanced view of what life in the armed forces involves be given to young people? Read more about the Military Out Of Schools campaign

get involved in the campaign

Look here for how you can get involved in the campaign.

Useful resources

November 2013

A ForcesWatch poster showing policy, cultural and other recent developments affecting the extent of military influence in young people's lives.

 

 


 

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June 2013

The youth edition of Journeys in the Spirit provides a range of ideas to use with 12–18 year olds in a Quaker context.

Quakers and the Military includes listening, talking and action points and explores the following questions:

  • What is the military? What are military values?
  • When do we encounter (see/meet) the military?
  • How did Quakers feel about the military in the past, and what did they do about it?
  • How do we feel about the military now?
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updated May 2013

This ForcesWatch briefing outlines the methods and rationale of the military's engagement with young people within the education system and highlights potential developments in this area, including projects under consideration or development by the Armed Forces and the Department of Education.

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March 2013

Unpacking 'recruitment' - what does the MoD mean when it says it does not recruit in schools?

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December 2012

A ForcesWatch briefing on the Government policy of expanding cadets and promoting 'military skills and ethos' in schools. It looks at:

  • what are the cadet forces
  • how will the cadet forces be expanded
  • why is this happening - who benefits
  • why is this a problem
  • what can we do about it
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June 2012

Up and down the country on the 30th June street parties, picnics and military tattoos are taking place for Armed Forces Day. Despite the rhetoric of tradition, the day is relatively new to Britain's military history, with the first occurrence taking place in 2009, replacing Veterans' Day, which ran from 2006-2009.

Some see the institution of another national occasion relating to the Armed Forces (i.e. in addition to Remembrance Day) as indicative of a growing culture of militarisation across the country. After consultation with parents, teachers and students who are concerned with the unquestioning attitude of acceptance towards the military and their activities in the public sphere, ForcesWatch has produced the following lesson plans and activities for those working in schools and other youth organisations to use, free of charge, with their students or group members. This is a direct response to the materials produced by the Armed Forces for teachers.

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May 2012

This ForcesWatch briefing is for parents, students and teachers concerned with military activities in their school. It looks at:

  • how and why the armed forces engage with schools and colleges
  • perspecitves on armed forces activities in schools and colleges
  • things to think about before raising concerns with the school
  • points and questions to raise with the school
  • alternatives to military-led activities
  • sources of more information
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May 2012

Contents

  • Countering the Militarisation of Youth introduction
  • Challenging the military's involvement in education in the United Kingdom
  • Universities, the Bundeswehr and “networked security”
  • How the U.S. collects data on potential recruits
  • Recruitment of and resistance by queers - example Sweden
  • Child Soldiers: Learning from Kony2012?
  • Countering the Militarisation of Youth
  • African Nonvio­lence Trainers Exchange
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May 2012

"We call on the National Assembly to urge the Welsh Government to recommend that the armed forces should not go into schools to recruit.

Britain is the only country in the European Union that allows a military presence in its schools. Britain is the only country of the 27 European Union countries to recruit 16-year-old children to the armed forces. The armed forces target their recruitment in schools in the most deprived areas of Wales."

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2011 update, U.S. 14 minutes

A 14 minute film made by the American Friends Service Committee and Veterans for Peace, updated in 2011. An informative deconstruction of a US army recruitment video and moving reflection on the effects of going to war. With testimony from a number of young and older veterans.

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